Thursday, 25 June 2015

The Alms-bowl of a Theravada monk

The monk’s alms-bowl is only used to receive cooked food offered by willing donors. The monk strictly does not accept money with his bowl or on his alms-round.
The Theravada monk
A Theravada Buddhist monk only consumes food between the break of dawn and noon (12pm). Thus, he does not go about collecting alms-food after mid-day. The monk goes on Pindacāra mindfully observing ‘noble silence’. He does not engage in talking or chatting with others.
The Alms-bowl
The monk’s alms-bowl is only used to receive cooked food offered by willing donors. The monk strictly does not accept money with his bowl or on his alms-round.
Benefit to lay devotees
Offering alms-food to monks allow lay people to acquire merits as a result of their kind intentions and actions. Doing good deeds daily is a way of self-cultivation and to live a noble way of life. The proper way for the laity to offer alms is to perform it joyfully, mindfully, and respectfully towards the monk(s).

Source : Nalanda Buddhist Society
Nalanda first posted on 29 August 2012